Process of a stone landing in water

One of na­ture’s most beau­ti­ful spec­ta­cles is simply the way a wa­tery sur­face dances when a fall­ing stone hits it, es­pe­cially in the first in­stants after the strike.

One of na­ture’s most beau­ti­ful spec­ta­cles is simply the way a wa­tery sur­face dances when a fall­ing stone hits it, es­pe­cially in the first in­stants after the strike. But physicists aren’t entirely clear how this pro­cess un­folds.

If one drops a peb­ble in­to a pond, a very rap­id, thin plume of wa­ter spouts up­wards.As the ob­ject en­ters the wa­ter, a tube-shaped air ca­vity forms be­hind it, the in­ves­ti­ga­tors not­ed. Mo­ments lat­er, the wa­ter closes in on the ca­vity and fills it again, but in the pro­cess, the wa­ter squeezes some of it­self up­ward. It’s like tooth­paste be­ing squeezed out of a tube, ac­cord­ing to the re­search­ers.

In­ci­den­tal­ly, they added, a sec­ond jet is also formed and forced down­ward, deeper in­to the liq­uid, at the same time. This sec­ond jet is­n’t vis­i­ble from above.When the ca­vity col­lapses, the first point of clo­sure is at its mid­dle.

The con­tin­ued clos­ing of the air ca­vity is nec­es­sary to pro­vide the nec­es­sary force. It’s like the dif­fer­ence be­tween squeez­ing a tooth­paste tube once and squeez­ing it in a con­tin­u­ous mo­tion to­ward the noz­zle, very quick­ly

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